Thursday, March 27, 2008

The Ultimate Blonde- Advice from Brad Johns

There she is- my ultimate blonde, Reese. Just looking at her blonde hair makes me regret changing my color from blonde to a light brown. I'm sure that I'll be going blonder as the weather warms up.

But, unless you are naturally this blonde (and so few of us are as we get older), staying this blonde is a huge undertaking. I really do not recommend dramatically changing your hair color without the help of a professional. Really, the investment is well worth it!

Lucky for us, we got some great advice for maintaining your blonde hair from Brad Johns, one of the premier colorists in New York City! Brad is the national color director for Elizabeth Arden Red Door Spas, and works long hours maintaining those "Bergdorf Blondes"!

How should you change your hair care routine for the summer months?
In the summer months, there are always more environmental stresses on the hair, such as salt water, sun, chlorine and salt, which add dryness and cause extra color fading. To prevent all of this, I always suggest using shampoo and conditioning treatment that contain UV protectors. Similarly to how you would care for your face/skin, you should take the time to treat your hair the same. In the winter, you should use more moisturizing products. I suggest changing your hair care routine every season, as hair tends to get used to your products and they are not as effective.


What are your favorite products for those times?
Products from the Davines collection


What summer elements fade hair color and why?
Chlorine is the absolute worst. Chemicals will harm all colors. It turns blondes green and brunettes orange.

Sun and salt water are known to fade color, but usually fade it in a natural way. It sometimes looks good and sunkissed, as long as you're not in a corrective color mode or have had color problems over the winter.


What is the best way to prevent fading and/or preserve color?
The best way is to wear a hat or a headband. Avoid oil-based hair products, as they attract the sun and magnify the color fading. Hair gels, waxes and crèmes protect the hair like an umbrella.


Why does blond hair tend to turn green or orange? How can this be prevented?
Any time that there are chemicals around the color, the hair strand is going to change. If it turns green, it means that you've exposed your hair to harsh water, chemicals, etc. A good way to understand this is by comparing hair strands to metal, where if brass is exposed to chemicals it will turn green. This happens when the chemicals attack. Orange happens when the sun fades the color molecules and takes out the brownish color, leaving you with an unflattering bronzy/orange color.


How should you correct your hair color problems if it has turned orange or green? Is the only recourse to run to your colorist?
Anything UV can be preventative. Also, another thing you can do to prevent color from turning green is as soon as you get out of the pool, pour club soda all over the hair. This will help take out the chlorine chemical that causes discoloration. But, when your hair gets to the point of severe orange/green you have to go in to see a specialist.

3 comments:

karen, makeupandbeautyblog.com said...

If I could pull off blonde, then I'd be Reese's blonde, fo' sho! But alas, it's not meant to be :)

jessica said...

I think she looks really pretty with that hair do i mean shes already cute but this tops it : )

Airbrush Makeup said...

She looks very cute in this hear style, this style has improved her beauty and now she looks more beautiful.

Post a Comment

I love comments! Please ask away, provide info on how you liked something, etc. Note that spam, comments with random links (which I count as spam), anything not in english (again, spam) and comments that are completely unrelated to anything will all be deleted.

progrids